Lateral entry into the civil services may create synergy between the government and big businesses, but it will also compromise the integrity of the government.

This article first appeared in The Wire and is republished here with the kind permission of its author.

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Nidhi 1

Louis Dreyfus Scholar Nidhi Singh (MSc Law and Finance) reflects on her year spent with the Weidenfeld-Hoffmann Trust in Oxford.

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Rural school

Arcadia Weidenfeld Scholar Poojan Shrestha (MSc International Health and Tropical Medicine) originally planned on doing his pro bono project at a school where he hoped to launch a health education class with some of his medical colleagues. Instead, he found himself leading an investigation on the front line of an infectious outbreak, working to protect villagers in rural Nepal.

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Marsyangdi Hydroelectric Project

Louis Dreyfus-Weidenfeld Scholar Birendra Rana (MSc Water Science, Policy and Management) received a Max Weidenfeld travel grant to conduct research for his thesis in Nepal. In this blog post, he shares the results of this research

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Irina at House of Lords

Irina Fedorenko, WHT DPhil Scholar at the School of Geography at Oxford, has presented a case for supporting youth entrepreneurship and youth-led NGOs at the panel at the House of Lords on May 24.

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Children at KISS Odisha

The President of the United Nations General Assembly released the final text of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) last year in 2015. The post 2015 outcome recognizes that ‘Children and young men and women are critical agents of change’. This was the result of the Rio+20 Summit in 2012, which mandated the creation of an open working group to come up with a draft agenda. The transition from Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to SDGs offers the youth both a bigger opportunity and challenge to bring about a change in the world we live in. In my view, the starting point for any youth should be to think of himself or herself as a global citizen. I was privileged to be a part of the cohort selected to attend the Youth Assembly at the United Nations at UN Headquarters in the New York City in February 2016. I had the opportunity to meet delegates from more than 70 countries and to learn about their perspectives on their role in implementation of SDGs. In the note below, I have highlighted my experience of attending this conference in one of the most powerful organizations of the world and on being shortlisted as a finalist for the outstanding delegate at United Nations.

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In 2015, Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) marked the 20-year anniversary of the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement. Today, the legacy of this agreement still affects the citizens, politics, economy and society. A Weidenfeld – Hoffmann Alumna, Lana Pasic, examines the effects of the agreement on contemporary Bosnia in her e-book Twenty Years After Dayton: Where is Bosnia and Herzegovina Today?

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Weidenfeld-Hoffmann alumnus Shohini Sengupta writes to us from New Delhi, where she is a Research Fellow at the Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy. Her research covers law and financial regulation, providing assessment and advice for the Indian government. In this blog post, she discusses her work and her recently published article on corporate responsibility

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Louis Dreyfus Scholar Simukai Chigudu recently returned to Oxford after conducting field research in Northern Uganda among women’s peace activists. His article based on this research, ‘The Social Imaginaries of Women’s Peace Activism in Northern Uganda,’ has been published in the International Feminist Journal of Politics. In this blog post, he discusses the work he did and the ideas with which he has engaged.

The metanarrative of global feminism is often constructed as a progressive and emancipatory movement emanating from the West and fostering radical politics elsewhere in the world. Such a view is not only ethnocentric but, critically, it fails to engage with the complex ways in which feminist politics travel and are evinced in specific localities. In this blog post, based on a recently published research article entitled ‘The Social Imaginaries of Women’s Peace Activism in Northern Uganda’, I seek to understand how marginalised women in the ‘Global South’ – particularly in Africa – interpret, experience and negotiate feminist ideas to wield political power within the context of their social and moral worlds.

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Lord Weidenfeld's Resting Place

Alexandra Henderson, CEO and Director of the Weidenfeld-Hoffmann Trust, recently attended Lord Weidenfeld’s funeral in Israel, and has shared her impressions of the day.

A small group of us close friends joined the family to witness George being taken to his last resting place on the Mount of Olives. A few years ago George had told me that his friend, Jacqui Safra, had suddenly announced that he had secured a very special present for him and Annabelle – burial plots for them both in Jerusalem. Although it seemed impossible that his body could be spirited there within forty eight hours, this is just what happened.

By Friday morning a group of around thirty had arrived from different corners of the world and we set off from Tel Aviv in a convoy of people carriers. It was a beautiful, sunny, warm day and as a newcomer to the country I was struck by the stark landscape that we drove through. Suddenly we found ourselves in a traffic jam winding our way around the hillside outside the walls of the city, tiny roads full of honking horns and impatient travellers whilst on each side, behind stone walls and gates was a sea of white. We stopped the traffic as we went up and down looking for the right gate. Eventually we saw a small group of people in sombre clothes and guessed we were at the right spot. We joined others who had come from Tel Aviv and then, just behind Annabelle, were two young men carrying the simple shroud which they put down, quite roughly, on a trolley feet away from the grave.

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